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WILD OATS

Reference #: 1,362
Submit Date: 06 Nov 2007
Browse Category: wild oats
Author: none
Email Address: wsotr@hotmail.com
Treatment used: none
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Remedy will cost you: unknown
Country of Remedy: USA
Remedy Source: Waters Singing on the Rocks
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Browse: wild oats

Remedy Description

For a consultation and research contact Waters-singing-on-the-rocks at wsotr@hotmail.com



WILD OATS (Avena Sativa)



This is in the Grasses Family - it is NOT the same as the Wild

Oats listed in Peterson's Guide, which is in the Lily Family and

has a different genus/Latin name (Uvularia sessilifolia L.). A

good example of why using common names does not always

successfully identify a particular herb - therefore the Latin

name can be extremely important for identification purposes. The

Milky Oats that Gloria identified for us has large leaves and the

seed pods hang over like a bell. It often grows, in East Texas,

alongside Italian Rye. The Rye seed pods point up.



As far as I know, the seeds are the only medicinal part -

though Gloria spoke of using the whole plant. As a grain of

course, oats are extremely nutritious . It is an incomplete

protein considered to be high in minerals such as Potassium and

Calcium. It contains about equal portions of mono- and poly-

unsaturated fats and a small amount of Vitamin A, Thiamin and

Riboflavin. The bran coating of the seed, as a food or

supplement, helps to lower cholesterol levels, to regulate blood

glucose (sugar) levels and as fiber for the intestinal tract,

assists in the removal of toxins.



For medicinal purposes the seedpod must be unripe and MILKY -

a white liquid pops out when the pod is squeezed. A tincture can

be made from these unripe seeds. The dosage would be 10-20 drops

up to 4 times daily. A standard infusion can also be made using

the whole fresh plant when they are fresh and green. Proportions

are 1:2 parts plant to water. Dosage of the tea would be 4-8

ounces a day.



Milky Oatseeds are a SEDATIVE or NERVINE. Specific for folks

who are emotionally and spiritually "fried". Or, to

quote Gloria's teacher, Michael Moore, it is for "crispy

critters". When a person is exhausted, depressed, stressed,

this herb can be used to strengthen the entire nervous system. It

is said to ease nervous headaches from overworking or during

menstruation. Wild (Milky) Oat tincture mixes well with skullcap

and other relaxing or sedating herbs... the calcium in the oats

enhances the actions of these others.



As an easily-digested food oats are often used to speed

recovery during convalescence especially from fevers and cardiac

difficulties. Uncooked or cooked Oat-water is a soothing

anti-itch preparation and is often used to dilute milk and baby

foods for tots who have diarrhea. Adults too, can benefit from

drinking the water in which oats have been cooked (this must be a

bit thicker than for the previous 2 uses) for diarrhea and

dyssentery.



The tincture reportedly can relieve spasms in the neck of the

bladdeer and, tho it does not treat the rheumatism itself, many

of the eclectic writers used it for the "debility

(feebleness) underlying the rheumatic diathesis".

This remedy can also be used for: