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Warts and the figs/ latex cure

Reference #: 884
Submit Date: 17 Jan 2007
Browse Category: warts
Author: none
Email Address: none
Treatment used: figs
You can buy this remedy at: any food store
Remedy will cost you: unknown
Country of Remedy: USA
Remedy Source: http://www.foodcontamination.ca/fsnet/2004/5-2004/fsnet_may_29.htm
More Links about this Remedy: http://www.foodcontamination.ca/fsnet/2004/5-2004/fsnet_may_29.htm
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# of times remedy read: 3,977


Dosage Info:
Typical Dosage: unknown
Dosage should be related to weight: unknown
 
Dosages used in clinical trials are significant: unknown
Maximum dosages in relation to side effects and serious side effects: unknown
Other foods/nutrients/medications that can affect absorption or utilization: unknown
Foods that provide the nutrient recommended as a remedy (or reference giving same): unknown



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Browse: warts

Remedy Description

Figs may inhibit growth and survival of harmful microbes in food

May 27, 2004

American Society for Microbiology



NEW ORLEANS New studies show that figs and figs extracts may be effective at inhibiting the survival and growth of harmful microbes in food. Researchers from

North Carolina A&T State University present their findings today at the 104th General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology.

For years, trees throughout Europe and the Mediterranean have been cultivated and fig extracts have been used to fight various ailments such as constipation,

bronchitis, mouth disorders and wounds.



Externally, they are found in the latex used in ridding patients of warts.

In the research presented today, Maysoun Salameh and colleagues examined the antimicrobial effect of figs extracts on the reduction and inhibition of microbial

loads of the popular food contaminants, E.coli and Salmonella. Figs were sliced and blended into liquid after which strains of E.coli and Salmonella were added

to the solution. After an incubation period of up to twenty-four hours, results showed a reduction in bacterial growth. Control samples not treated with fig

juice revealed an increase in bacteria.

"These findings can be utilized by the food industry in the future by adding figs extracts, its original and/or modified liquid form, to processed foods," says

Salameh. "Its active component can also be isolated into pure forms as natural food additives into many food products."

In a related study also presented today, another group of researchers from North Carolina A&T will present data illustrating the antimicrobial properties of

guava extract and its potential use as an all natural food preservative.

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